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In his celebrated military treatise “The Art of War,” Sun-Tzu wrote about how understanding your enemy and yourself would ensure success in almost any scenario. And while he might happen to be talking to an audience worried about winning and waging wars, it is a principle that holds true in a number of other aspects of existence as well — perhaps not the least which is identity theft. The initial step in knowing the best way to guard your identity from offenders and fraud is understanding how and why you are susceptible in the first place, as well as the way in which thieves find their prey.

identity theft threatsAmong the greatest risk factors for discovering yourself in the sights of an id thief is your age. While years alone do not establish your susceptibility to idtheft — a a study by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) identified no more than a-1 percent variation in fraud charges filed by 20-year olds, 30-year olds, 40-year olds and 50-year olds — environmentally friendly and life-style variables that accompany each decade of your life can get you at a higher-risk for fraud.

Here are three demographics which are especially exposed to id thieves:

University students: In your teens and 20s, whilst in school, you have stepped right into an entirely new world of duty and independence. Sadly, many university students do not understand the extent of that duty until it is not too early. School-aged Americans are four-times more probably than another demographic to get their identities stolen because they’ve usually clean credit histories but no expertise with understanding that they are presumed to assess them or assessing them. University students do not help themselves both by sharing personally-identifying information about themselves freely on media platforms or leaving out private files in dorm rooms that are readily reachable.
Service members: There is a greater danger of the information falling into the incorrect hands and being used to perpetrate identity fraud since the armed forces uses private data like Social Security numbers to determine their servicemen as well as girls. In addition, research conducted by Javelin Strategy & Research identified that military personnel typically do not set Active Duty Alarms on their credit documents after they are deployed. Thus, their credit info is susceptible to fraud and abuse by pals and family members.

Senior Citizens: Their incidence of fraud is substantially higher, although less seniors fall victim to identity theft than other demographics. A lot more troubling is the fact that ID theft victims over the age of 55 are less probably than these younger than 55 to realize that their identities were stolen in any way! Telephone scams, phishing, tax frauds and health-related id fraud are one of the most common identity theft strategies employed against seniors.

But while these three people could be particularly at risk for id fraud, it is critical that proactive measures are taken by Americans of ages and occupations from the likelihood of larceny. While there is no bonded type of identity theft protection, there really are several common sense steps you could quickly adopt to mitigate your likelihood of becoming the most recent casualty.

One clever way of keeping ahead of identity thieves would be to join a credit monitoring service. This type of service send you alerts when specific action is discovered that could signal possible identity theft and will track your credit files.

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